Prostata Medicine  selmckenzie®)
Selzer-McKenzie Biotechnology (®) Laboratory, Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia

send eMail

Medikament zur Prostata-Behandlung, gewonnen aus der Pflanze Prunus African Baum, der im Etosha-Nationalpark in Namibia in bestimmter Art wächst, und die Pflanze Chinchona, die am Amazonas in spezifischer Form wächst.

Die Pflanze Prunus Africana und Chinchona:

Prunus ist eine Gattung der Rosengewächse (Rosaceae), die mehr als 200 Arten von Bäumen und Sträuchern umfasst, darunter viele wichtige Obstbäume. Die Arten sind sommergrüne, selten immergrüne Bäume und Sträucher und tragen häufig Dornen. Häufig bilden sie Wurzelsprosse. Die Blätter sind einfach und meistens mit gesägtem Blattrand, seltener ganzrandig oder gelappt. Am oberen Blattstielende sitzen häufig auffällige Drüsenhöcker, die als extraflorale Nektarien dienen. Nebenblätter sind vorhanden und bleibend oder hinfällig.

Die Blüten stehen meist in Trauben, Schirmtrauben oder Dolde, selten auch einzeln. Meist stehen sie an seitlichen Kurztrieben und erscheinen vor oder gleichzeitig mit den Blättern. Die Kelchblätter bilden nach innen meist Nektar und fallen nach der Blüte meist ab. Die Kronblätter sind weiss bis rot und fallen vor dem Welken ab. Es gibt 20 bis 30 Staubblätter und ein Fruchtblatt mit fast endständigem Griffel. Das Fruchtblatt beherbergt zwei Samenanlagen. Bei gefüllten Blüten kommen auch zwei oder drei Fruchtblätter vor. Die Früchte sind einsamige Steinfrüchte, häufig mit essbarem Fruchtfleisch. Die Samen sind von einer membranartigen Schale umgeben und sind häufig durch cyanogene Glykoside (hier meistens Amygdalin) giftig. In Spross und Wurzeln kommt meist Prunasin vor. Sorbitol wird in grösseren Mengen gebildet.

Die Chromosomengrundzahl ist x = 8.

Die Arten kommen vorwiegend in den Wäldern und Wüsten der nördlichen Hemisphäre vor, eine nicht geringe Anzahl von Arten kommt in den Tropen vor. Prunus wurde früher als einzige Gattung der Unterfamilie Steinobstgewächse (Amygdaloideae) angesehen. Aufgrund molekulargenetischer Untersuchungen wird die Gattung jedoch heute als Tribus Amygdaleae in die Unterfamilie Spiraeoideae gestellt.

Es gibt unterschiedliche Systematiken für die Gattung. Teilweise wurden die Arten in mehrere Gattungen aufgeteilt, dies wird jedoch durch molekulargenetische Arbeiten nicht gestützt. Padus, Padellus, Cerasus, Amygdalus, Persica, Armeniaca und Laurocerasus sind demnach alle in Prunus integriert und gelten nur mehr als Synonyme. Die klassische Untergliederung in fünf Untergattungen wird durch molekulargenetische Untersuchungen nur teilweise gestützt, es fehlt jedoch eine Klassifikation, die nur monophyletische Taxa listet


Prunus:
Prunus is a genus of trees and shrubs, including the plums, cherries, peaches, apricots and almonds. It is traditionally placed within the rose family Rosaceae as a subfamily, the Prunoideae (or Amygdaloideae), but sometimes placed in its own family, the Prunaceae (or Amygdalaceae). There are around 430 species spread throughout the northern temperate regions of the globe. The flowers are usually white to pink, with five petals and five sepals. They are borne singly, or in umbels of two to six or sometimes more on racemes. The fruit is a drupe (a "prune") with a relatively large hard coated seed (a "stone"). Leaves are simple and usually lanceolate, unlobed and toothed along the margin.

Many species produce hydrogen cyanide, usually in their leaves and seeds. This gives a characteristic taste in small (trace) quantities, and becomes bitter in larger quantities. The word is infrequent in original Latin. Pliny uses prūnus silvestris to mean the blackthorn. The English word prune is derived from the same source. The Online Etymological Dictionary presents the customary derivations of plum and prune from Latin prūnum, the plum, which is frequent in a number of authors, including Pliny. The word is not native Latin, but is a loan from Greek προ νον (prounon) which is a variant of προ μνον (proumnon), origin unknown. Most dictionaries follow Hoffman, Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Grieschischen, in making it a loan from a pre-Greek language of Asia Minor, related to Phrygian.

The Latin word prūnus and Greek word προύμνη (proumnē) refer to the plum tree.

The first use of Prunus as a genus name belongs to Linnaeus in Hortus Cliffortianus of 1737, which went on to become Species Plantarum. In that work Linnaeus attributes the word to "Varr.", who it is assumed must be Marcus Terentius Varro.
In 1737 Linnaeus used four genera to include the species of modern Prunus — Amygdalus, Cerasus, Prunus and Padus — but simplified it to Amygdalus and Prunus in 1758. Since then the various genera of Linnaeus and others have become subgenera and sections, as it clearer that all the species are more closely related. Liberty Hyde Bailey says: The numerous forms grade into each other so imperceptibly and inextricably that the genus cannot be readily broken up into species . A recent DNA study of 48 species concluded that Prunus is monophyletic and is descended from some Eurasian ancestor.

Historical treatments break the genus up into several different genera, but this segregation is not currently widely recognised other than at the subgeneric rank. ITIS recognises just the single genus Prunus, with an open list of species, all of which are shown below, under "Species". One standard modern treatment of the subgenera derives from the work of Alfred Rehder in 1940. Rehder hypothesized five subgenera: Amygdalus, Prunus, Cerasus, Padus and Laurocerasus. To them C. Ingram added Lithocerasus.[6] The six subgenera are described as follows:

* Prunus subgenera:
o Subgenus Amygdalus: almonds and peaches. Axillary buds in threes (vegetative bud central, two flower buds to sides). Flowers in early spring, sessile or nearly so, not on leafed shoots. Fruit with a groove along one side; stone deeply grooved. Type species Prunus dulcis (Almond).
o Subgenus Prunus: plums and apricots. Axillary buds solitary. Flowers in early spring stalked, not on leafed shoots. Fruit with a groove along one side; stone rough. Type species Prunus domestica (Plum).
o Subgenus Cerasus: cherries. Axillary buds single. Flowers in early spring in corymbs, long-stalked, not on leafed shoots. Fruit not grooved; stone smooth. Type species Prunus cerasus (Sour cherry).
o Subgenus Lithocerasus: dwarf cherries. Axillary buds in threes. Flowers in early spring in corymbs, long-stalked, not on leafed shoots. Fruit not grooved; stone smooth. Type species Prunus pumila (Sand cherry).
o Subgenus Padus: bird cherries. Axillary buds single. Flowers in late spring in racemes on leafy shoots, short-stalked. Fruit not grooved; stone smooth. Type species Prunus padus (European bird cherry).
o Subgenus Laurocerasus: cherry-laurels. Axillary buds single. Flowers in early spring in racemes, not on leafed shoots, short-stalked. Fruit not grooved; stone smooth. Mostly evergreen (all the other subgenera are deciduous). Type species Prunus laurocerasus (European cherry-laurel).

Another recent DNA study  found that Amygdaloideae can be divided into two clades: Prunus-Maddenia, with Maddenia basal within Prunus, and Exochorda-Oemleria-Prinsepia. Prunus can be divided into two clades: Amygdalus-Prunus and Cerasus-Laurocerasus-Padus. Yet another study adds Empectocladus as a subgenus to the former.
The genus Prunus includes the almond, apricot, cherry, peach and plum, all of which have cultivars developed for commercial fruit and "nut" production. The edible part of the almond is the seed; the almond fruit is a drupe and not a true nut. Many other species are occasionally cultivated or used for their seed and fruit.

There are also a number of species, hybrids, and cultivars grown as ornamental plants, usually for their profusion of flowers, sometimes for ornamental foliage and shape, occasionally for their bark. These ornamentals include the group that may be collectively called flowering cherries (including sakura, the Japanese flowering cherries). Other species such as blackthorn are grown for hedging, game cover, and other utilitarian purposes. The wood of some species is a minor and specialised timber (cherry wood), usually from larger tree species such as the wild cherry. Many species produce an aromatic resin from wounds in the trunk; this is sometimes used medicinally. There are other minor uses, including other medicinal uses, and dye production.

Pygeum is a herbal remedy containing extracts from the bark of Prunus africana. It is used as to alleviate some of the discomfort caused by inflammation in patients suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia. Because of their considerable value as both food and ornamental plants, many Prunus species have been introduced to parts of the world to which they are not native, some becoming naturalised. Prunus species are used as food plants for the larvae of a large number of Lepidoptera species (butterflies and moths); see List of Lepidoptera which feed on Prunus.

Chinchona:

Cinchona is a genus of about 25 species in the family Rubiaceae, native to tropical South America. They are large shrubs or small trees growing to 5-15 metres tall with evergreen foliage.

The leaves are opposite, rounded to lanceolate, 10-40 cm long. The flowers are white, pink or red, produced in terminal panicles. The fruit is a small capsule containing numerous seeds.

The name of the genus is due to Carolus "Carl" Linnaeus, who named the tree in 1742 after a Countess of Chinchon, the wife of a viceroy of Peru, who, in 1638, was introduced by natives to the medicinal properties of the bark. Stories of the medicinal properties of this bark, however, are perhaps noted in journals as far back as the 1560s-1570s (see the Ortiz link below).

Cinchona species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including The Engrailed, The Commander, and members of the genus Endoclita including E. damor, E. purpurescens and E. sericeus.

Cinchona pubescens is known for its bark's high quinine content- and has similar uses to Cinchona officinalis in the production of quinine, most famously used for treatment of malaria (Kinyuy et al. 1993). Its native range spans Costa Rica, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. In Ecuador, C. pubescens is distributed within an altitude from 300 to 3900 m and has the widest distribution of all Cinchona species (Acosta-Solis 1945; Missouri Botanical Garden specimen database 2002) Its distribution is at well documented by the Missouri Botanic Garden's Nomenclatural Data Base w3TROPICOS.

Planted outside of its native range on tropical islands it has become an invasive species (Invasive Species Specialist Group. In Galapagos it has become a dominant species in the formerly shrub dominated Miconia and Fern-Sedge zones (sensu Wiggins and Porter 1971) on Santa Cruz Island (Buddenhagen & Yánez 2005; Buddenhagen et al. 2004; Jäger 1999; Kastdalen 1982; Lawesson 1990; Macdonald et al. 1988; Mauchamp 1997; Tye 2000; and see more references below). It is also invasive in Hawaii on Maui and the Big Island

Cinchona Alkaloids:

There are about 40 different species of Cinchona tree all of which are indigenous to the slopes of the Andes, however because of their commercial importance, several of these species are now widely cultivated in many tropical countries.

The cinchona alkaloids are a family of natural products which can be isolated from cinchona trees. The most abundant of these alkaloids is quinine and this, along with quinidine, cinchonine and cinchonidine, can comprise up to 16% by mass of the tree bark. The bark is usually harvested by beating the tree trunks and then removing the material that peels away. The tree can partially regenerate its bark over a few years, and several cycles of removing the bark and letting it grow back can be achieved before the trees have to be uprooted and replaced by new ones.







CHARACTERISTICS
QUININE SULPHATE
Active molecule : Quinine
Pharmachemical group: Antimalarial alcaloïd
Obtention way: Natural product extract from Chinchona barks.
Delivery as : Raw material
Chemical name : Bis (R)-(6-méthoxyquinolin-4-yl)-[2S,4S,5R)-5-éthenyl-1-azabicyclo [2.2.2]oct-2-yl]méthanol], Sulfate
Molecular weigth : 783.0
Brut Formula : (C20H24N202) 2, H2SO4,2H2O
Stuctural formula :
Caracters : White cristalline powder, odourless, bitter, sparingly soluble in boiling water and alcool and pratically insoluble in ether R.
Purity norms : Quinine sulphate contains not less than 99.0 percent and not more than 101.0 percent of alcaloid calculated as(C20H24N202)2, H2SO4,2H2O, with reference to the dried substance..
Specific optical rotation : -237 to -245 degrees, determined on solution S calculated with reference to the dried substance.
Acidity (pH): The pH of a 10 g/l suspension in water R is 5.7 to 6.6.
Analitical references: for other analytical protocols of quinine sulphate, see European, british and International pharmacopoeias.
Storage : Store in a well-closed container, protected fron light
Stability : 5 years
QUININE HYDROCHLORIDE
Active molecule : Quinine
Pharmachemical group: Antimalarial alcaloïd
Obtention way: In the manufatural process, quinine sulphate is the first natural product extract from Chinchona barks. Quinine hydrochloride yieds from quinine sulphate by traitement with hydrochlorid acid.
Delivery as : Raw material
Chemical name : Bis (R)-(6-méthoxyquinolin-4-yl)-[2S,4S,5R)-5-éthenyl-1-azabicyclo [2.2.2]oct-2-yl]méthanol], hydrochloride
Molecular weigth : 396.9
Brut Formula : (C20H24N202) 2, HCl, 2H2O
Stuctural formula :
Caracters : White cristalline powder, odourless, bitter, soluble in water and alcool and very sparingly soluble in ether R.
Purity norms : Quinine sulphate contains not less than 98.5 percent and not more than 101.0 percent of alcaloid calculated as (C20H24N202) 2, HCl, 2H2O, with reference to the dried substance..
Specific optical rotation : -240 to -258 degrees, determined on solution S calculated with reference to the dried substance.
Acidity (pH): The pH of a 10 g/l suspension in water R is 6.0 to 7.0.
Analitical references: for other analytical protocols of quinine hydrochloride, see European, british and International pharmacopoeias.
Storage : Store in a well-closed container, protected fron light
Stability : 5 years
QUININE DIHYDROCHLORIDE
Active molecule : Quinine
Pharmachemical group: Antimalarial alcaloïd
Obtention way: In the manufatural process, quinine sulphate is the first natural product extract from Chinchona barks. Quinine hydrochloride yieds from quinine sulphate by traitement with HCl. Quinine dihydrochloride yieds from quinine hydrochloride by traitement with HCl.
Delivery as : Raw material
Chemical name : Bis (R)-(6-méthoxyquinolin-4-yl)-[2S,4S,5R)-5-éthenyl-1-azabicyclo [2.2.2]oct-2-yl]méthanol], dihydrochloride
Molecular weigth : 397.3
Brut Formula : (C20H24N202) 2, 2HCl
Stuctural formula :
Purity norms : Quinine dihydrochloride contains not less than 99.0 percent and not more than 101.0 percent of alcaloid calculated as (C20H24N202) 2, 2HCl, with reference to the dried substance..
Specific optical rotation : -223 to -229 degrees, determined on solution S calculated with reference to the dried substance.
Acidity (pH): The pH of a 10 g/l suspension in water R is 2.0 to 3.0.
Analitical references: for other analytical protocols of quinine dihydrochloride, see European, british and International pharmacopoeias.
Storage : Store in a well-closed container, protected fron light
Stability : 5 years

.....


Die Prostata, auch Vorsteherdrüse genannt, ist eine kastaniengrosse Drüse, die unter der Blase liegt und die Harnröhre umschliesst. Ihre hauptsächliche Funktion ist die Produktion eines Sekrets, das dem Sperma als Transport- und Aktivierungsmittel dient. Zudem sorgt es zusammen mit dem Blasenschliessmuskel einerseits dafür, dass beim Samenerguss das Ejakulat durch die Harnröhre über den Penis nach aussen befördert wird und nicht in die Blase gelangt, und andererseits verhindert es, dass beim Wasserlassen Urin in die Samenwege gelangen kann. Etwa mit dem zwanzigsten Lebensjahr ist das Organ vollständig entwickelt und hat seine normale Grösse erreicht.

Gutartige Prostatavergrösserung

Ab dem 40. bis 50. Lebensjahr verändert sich das Prostatagewebe. Die Muskel- und Bindegewebsschichten um die Harnröhre vermehren sich und eine gutartige Geschwulst (Adenom) kann die Harnröhre einengen oder sogar in die Blase hineinwachsen. Die Vergrösserung der Prostata (Benigne Prostatahyperplasie – BPH) verengt die Harnröhre wie eine Faust, die einen Strohhalm langsam zudrückt. Typische Symptome sind häufiger Harndrang, langsame Blasenentleerung (Urin fliesst ohne Druck), Nachtröpfeln beim Wasserlassen, manchmal sogar Schmerzen oder Brennen beim Wasserlassen und das Gefühl, dass sich die Blase nicht vollständig entleeren konnte. Das mangelnde Wohlbefinden und Verunsicherung führen auch häufig zur Beeinträchtigung des Sexuallebens. So kann sich selbst diese gutartige Erkrankung sehr negativ auf die Lebensqualität der Patienten auswirken.

Prostatakarzinom

Prostatakrebs ist der häufigste Krebs des Mannes und steht an dritter Stelle krebsbedingter Todesursachen beim Mann. Prostatakarzinome bei Männern unter 50 Jahren sind selten. Prostatakrebs macht im Frühstadium in der Regel keinerlei Beschwerden.

Es gibt Prostatakarzinome, die sehr schnell wachsen, sehr aggressiv sind, Tochtergeschwülste (Metastasen) bilden und rasch zum Tode führen können, aber auch solche, die sehr langsam wachsen, weniger aggressiv sind und die Lebenserwartung nicht zwingend beeinträchtigen. Dies bedeutet, dass man an einem Prostatakrebs sterben kann, oder auch mit einem Prostatakrebs an anderen Todesursachen. Hierbei spielt u. a. das zu erwartende Lebensalter eine Rolle. Die Beurteilung der Aggressivität eines Prostatakrebses kann schwierig sein. Im Einzellfalle muss der Patient zusammen mit einem fachkundigen Arzt entscheiden, ob, wann und wie ein Prostatakrebs behandelt wird.

Prostatakrebs ist eine folgenschwere Erkrankung, die oft zum Tode führt. Doch je früher ein Prostatakarzinom entdeckt wird, desto höher ist die Chance des Patienten, vollständig zu genesen.

Digitalrektale Untersuchung

Eine Früherkennungsuntersuchung ist das Abtasten der Prostataoberfläche durch den Enddarm. Mit dieser digital-rektalen Methode können aber erst Tumoren in einem ertastbaren und damit relativ weit fortgeschrittenen Stadium entdeckt werden. Von einer „Früh-Erkennung" im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes kann daher nicht die Rede sein.

PSA-Test

Eine effektivere, aber im wissenschaftlichen Diskurs nicht undiskutierte Methode ist der sogenannte „PSA-Test". Dies ist ein Bluttest, der die PSA-Konzentration im Blut misst. PSA (Prostataspezifisches Antigen) ist eine von der Prostatadrüse produzierte Substanz, die auf natürlichem Wege in das Blut abgegeben wird. Eine erhöhte PSA-Konzentration kann ein früher Hinweis auf Prostatakrebs sein. Aber auch andere Erkrankungen (z. B. Vergrösserung der Prostata, Prostatitis, Harnwegsinfektion) können einen PSA-Anstieg verursachen. Ungefähr zwei von drei Männern mit erhöhtem PSA haben keinen Prostatakrebs. Aber: Je höher der PSA-Wert ist, desto wahrscheinlicher ist Krebs die Ursache. Bei einem Teil der Männer entwickelt sich der Prostatakrebs trotz eines normalen PSA-Spiegels. Eine PSA-Bestimmung sollte erst nach ausführlicher Aufklärung über die Vor- und Nachteile des PSA-Testes erfolgen.

• Der PSA-Test ist ein Bluttest.

• Eine erhöhte PSA-Konzentration kann ein frü- her Hinweis auf Prostakrebs sein.

• Trotzdem haben viele Männer mit erhöhtem PSA keinen Prostatkrebs.

• Es ist möglich – wenn auch sehr selten –, dass der PSA-Test den Prostatakrebs nicht erkennt.

• Nach neueren wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen ist die PSA-Anstiegsgeschwindigkeit (PSA-Velocity) ein weiterer Faktor zur Beurteilung eines erhöhten PSA-Wertes.

• Regelmässige Kontrolluntersuchungen werden deshalb empfohlen.